Self Awareness pt. 3: The Fitness Coach

the advice I would give to ‘Me’ – the 1st team fitness coach

Having just moved up into a full time position as a 1st Team Fitness Coach, you have been brought in to bridge the gap between the fitness and the football I want to provide ‘Me’ – The 1st Team Fitness Coach with the 6 pieces of advice.

Soccer - Barclays Premier League - Wolverhampton Wanderers v Fulham - Molineux

1.Understand how your role can impact on others and establish good working relationships

The days have gone when people work in isolation. It is important that you understand how your role will impact on others by understanding their roles. Work closely with the Manager, the coaches, the analyst and medical staff because everyone will have an impact on each other. Understand what they do, why they do it and how it links in with the work you will be carrying out. Go out of your way to observe, notice and ask questions, this will provide you will a good starting point.

2.Building rapport

Developing and building a rapport with players is very important. When you first go in players will make judgment on you, before you have even had a chance to say a word. So when you start working with the players, communicate, observe, and notice, showing emotional intelligence to understand the people you work with. Use the opportunity when working and chatting within small groups and individual sessions. Building this rapport will help develop trust and this will enable you to get the best out of the people you work with.

Pics Australia 2009 Pre-Season

3.Educate the players

Once you establish the trust, then take the opportunity to educate the players by encouraging them to understand the ‘Why’. You will get questioned, challenged, argued with, but players just want to know ‘Why’. They will be curious, interested, they will want to test you and challenge you in front of others, but overall they just want to believe in why and trust what you are doing will help them become a better player. So embrace the chance to educate and work with.

4.Embrace the chance to be taken out of your comfort zone

Working with high profile players, within pressure situations will take you out from your comfort zone. Make sure you embrace this opportunity to develop and improve yourself. You will make mistakes, you will get things wrong, you will be challenged and you will encounter disagreements. This is part of the course, this is good stuff that will help you learn and take you further.

5.Don’t take it personally

In front of you lies an exciting new challenge. One with new obstacles, pressures, excitements, which will put you in situations that will sometimes encourage you to doubt yourself and question yourself. Learn from them but refrain from taking them personally. Avoid dwelling on it or beating yourself up. After all people often says things and think things based on emotion before reason. It is important that you use your skill of reflection, at the appropriate time and with reason. This will help you to keep it all in perspective, learn from it and move forward.

6.Think outside the box

One of your strengths is your creativity, your ability to bring about new ideas and ways of thinking. Continue this within your new role, really focus on the specific demands of not just the individual fitness needs but their positional needs. Look at their movements, the decisions they make, the way they play the game, what is expected of them, the needs of the manager and develop your sessions based on that. Coach them back to fitness, don’t just get them back fit.

Self Awareness pt. 2: The Academy Coach

the advice I would give to ‘Me’ – the academy coach

I feel it is now time to chat with ‘Me’ the Academy Coach. He has been working within the academy program for 4 years at the South East London Club. After a fantastic experience with a great education it is time to start a new Chapter on the other side of town with a South West London Club. Here are six pieces of advice I would give him:

1.Embrace the education you have had

I recall when you had your 1st academy coaching session. You were organizing and setting up the session before the players arrived when you were approached by one of the Senior Academy Managers. He came up and something to you that will never forget ‘If the Academy Director sees you do a drill, he will sack you’. That shaped you into the coach you are at this moment in time. It gave you a direction, a belief and a way to work. The experience you have received within this particular environment has been invaluable because it has challenged you, taken you out of your comfort zone and helped developed your ability to adapt. Never forget this and use this to your advantage within your next opportunity.

2.Understand the brain

My advice is if you are going to study and learn anything, make sure it is on the brain. Have an understanding of how it works, develops, grows, reacts and is influenced by what you as a coach do. This will provide you with a good foundation, reasoning and will support to the type of sessions you design, and how you deliver them.

3.Be patient

Don’t worry if you don’t see immediate success. It will take time; players will develop and learn at different rates. Continue to engage and challenge the players you work with. It is a long journey for them with many up’s and downs which will impact their development. But if the players believe in what you believe, then they will have success in time.

Creativity is intelligence having fun

4.Continue to be Creative and Don’t Stand Still

Since you started coaching you have always you been observant and curious, asking why, how and what? Looking at how to develop sessions and ideas you have seen. You have also looked at other environments to engage your learning and development. Transferred across new ideas into football, which at times have been questioned, but have eventually been embraced. This kind of approach and thinking has developed your creative side and this is reflected in how you coach, challenging the players you work with. Take this further; keep moving forward as there is a whole world out there to inspire you and learn from. The only thing that is constant is ‘Change’, keeping developing and being creative.

5.Become an expert in your field

Everyone wants to reach the top but where is the top? Is it at the 1st team level or is it at the top of your specialised field? My advice is to learn, research and really understand about the specific age group you work with and become an expert in that field. Many coaches will look up, as there is more to be gained financially as they move up the ladder, but the game is crying out for coaches to become specialists/experts in these particular areas.

6.Educate the parents

Take the time to educate the parents and help them understand what they are seeing. Often with observation people will make assumptions, which will then create their opinions without actually understanding what they are seeing and why the coach is working the way they do. Invite the parents to be a part of their child’s development by allowing them to understand. After all, the player might only be working with you 7-10 hrs per week. Therefore, it is important they are encouraged to practice in the right way when away from you and also the right messages are being reinforced by the people that support them.