Self-Awareness Pt 4: The U21 Coach

the advice I would give ‘Me’ – the u21 coach

The next step in my journey is the position of U21 Coach, which I would hold for the next 3 years. I would have the opportunity work alongside the current Assistant Manager of England, and former 1st Team Manager of Fulham and current Assistant Manager of Wales.

As I continue this reflection process the six pieces of advice I would like to give ‘Me’ the U21 Coach would be:

Embrace the Challenge

The U21’s is a difficult squad to manage due to the inconsistency of the playing staff and the uncertainty of which players you will have in the training group from one day to the next (I will elude to this in another piece of advice). It can often be a challenge when preparing for the games, especially with the last minute additions and withdrawals. Therefore, how you manage the individuals, and the team will have an impact on how they perform within both training and within games. Consider your message, keeping it simple and engaging in order to get effective get your ideas across to your players.

taking-a-risk

Prepare for the Unexpected – Be Adaptable

You will arrive for your session with the intention to work on a specific topic, with a specific number of players. You will come across those managers that prepare in advance and let you know what players they will be giving you and what they will need from you, which will give you time to prepare. On the other hand there will be those other managers that leave it until 10-15mins before training starts, after you have set up and are ready to begin. Unfortunately, there is not much you can do about that that is the order of the food chain. Therefore, always be prepared to adapt for changes at the last minute and expect the unexpected. Prepare for the unexpected and always have a contingency plan. This will test not only your creative ability but also your ability as a coach to not allow your emotions to take the lead.

Awareness of the groups within the group

Empathy and awareness for individual players are going to be two keys skill sets required whilst working with this group. Take the time to observe, notice and ask questions. Within this one group you will have many other groups who are at different phases of their career displaying different types of behaviours and emotions. For example, you might have players who have just moved into the U21 squad, players who are not quite good enough for the 1st team squad, players that are not wanted by the 1st team management, players who are looking to get out on loan, players that are returning from injury and players that are coming up from the academy looking to prove themselves. This will challenge your skills of coaching and management of players.

Winning and Development

This is a challenge within any competitive environment, but especially when going into this phase. There has been a change in the structure within the development program of professional football going from reserve team football to U21football. The U21 program is still used in a similar fashion, providing game time for those senior players not in the 1st team squad or those players returning from injury. This can have an affect on managing the desired outcome of the game. Be prepared for that so manage and prepare for a variety of expectations from both a development and a winning standpoint.

Encourage the Players to Take Control

There is a danger that players, especially within the current environments are becoming very dependent on the club and staff. Make sure you encourage players to take responsibility, to take control of their own destiny. Have those conversations with them, guide them, coaching them and support them so they take the lead. After all it is their career, their future and they need to decide what they want to achieve and how they are going to achieve it. They need to be the driving force using their passion, perseverance and desire supported by you as coach to provide them with a program to that will help them work toward their goals. After all, look at how you got to where you did.

Take advantage to learn from the experienced Managers you work alongside

This is going to be a great opportunity for you, working alongside two very good people (who have become friends of yours) with great experience from playing through to coaching and management. They will embrace, encourage you to take a lead, support and guide you along the way. Make sure you take every little bit you can from this. Don’t leave any stone unturned. Notice, observe, ask questions and appreciate such a great opportunity.

 

More than just an English Word

As my girlfriend prepares for the start of the new academic year, in her 8th year as a teacher, she goes into her school during the summer to prepare her classroom for her new students. On a couple of occasion’s she has asked for me to come and help maneuver some of the furniture as she shapes her learning environment.

She is about to inherit 25 new students who are all unique. They come from different backgrounds, with different skills sets, they are at varies stages in their learning displaying both strengths and weaknesses. She has done her homework, she has taken the time to speak with the teacher about the individual students, she has read their reports, met the children themselves and is prepared for what lies ahead, but she also has the ability to adapt her teaching / educating to suit the needs of her children. I am sure that this is the case for many other teachers, but there is something else that she has that can impact on not only a child’s development but also a member of staff, and I was witness to this.

As we were about to leave after we had spent a few hours organizing her classroom, we bumped into one of the cleaners in the school. When he saw her, his eyes lit up and there was a smile from ear to ear. She started to converse with him in Spanish. He spoke very limited English, if any at all, but when she started to speak with him in his native language he was able to engage and the conversation flowed. In the school she is the point of call for any conversations that might be required in Spanish with a staff member and any parents.

Previously she had mentioned to me about a student she had in her class, who spoke very little English and as a result this challenged his learning, She was able to work with him not only on his education but also his ability to speak English. This gave great comfort to his parents who also found the language a stumbling block, and her skill set gave them hope and trust with their child’s education.

The reason I mention this is because I look back at my own education I feel I missed out on the opportunity to learn a new language, appreciate and understand another culture. I once worked with an international player from South America who was a top professional and a good player. We had a number of 1 on 1 session’s coaching him back to fitness, but he didn’t speak a word of English. Initial translations would occur through one of the therapists who was Spanish and they spoke English, but on the grass it was just me and him. We worked through this by using demonstrations, hand gestures, diagrams etc but had I known the language that connection could have been better. We worked well together but I just look back and think I wish I had taken the opportunity when I was being educated to take learning an additional language a little more seriously. I guess hindsight is always a easy thing, but had a I known then what I knew know that working with a multicultural industry learning and additional language would have provided me with further opportunities. I am not saying it is too late now, but if is obviously a little more difficult.

My girlfriend speaks 5 languages and she is fluent in all of them. She not only has the ability to converse and translate but she has the ability to empathize, build relations, share an emotion, develop trust and ultimately help develop an individual.

Self Awareness pt. 3: The Fitness Coach

the advice I would give to ‘Me’ – the 1st team fitness coach

Having just moved up into a full time position as a 1st Team Fitness Coach, you have been brought in to bridge the gap between the fitness and the football I want to provide ‘Me’ – The 1st Team Fitness Coach with the 6 pieces of advice.

Soccer - Barclays Premier League - Wolverhampton Wanderers v Fulham - Molineux

1.Understand how your role can impact on others and establish good working relationships

The days have gone when people work in isolation. It is important that you understand how your role will impact on others by understanding their roles. Work closely with the Manager, the coaches, the analyst and medical staff because everyone will have an impact on each other. Understand what they do, why they do it and how it links in with the work you will be carrying out. Go out of your way to observe, notice and ask questions, this will provide you will a good starting point.

2.Building rapport

Developing and building a rapport with players is very important. When you first go in players will make judgment on you, before you have even had a chance to say a word. So when you start working with the players, communicate, observe, and notice, showing emotional intelligence to understand the people you work with. Use the opportunity when working and chatting within small groups and individual sessions. Building this rapport will help develop trust and this will enable you to get the best out of the people you work with.

Pics Australia 2009 Pre-Season

3.Educate the players

Once you establish the trust, then take the opportunity to educate the players by encouraging them to understand the ‘Why’. You will get questioned, challenged, argued with, but players just want to know ‘Why’. They will be curious, interested, they will want to test you and challenge you in front of others, but overall they just want to believe in why and trust what you are doing will help them become a better player. So embrace the chance to educate and work with.

4.Embrace the chance to be taken out of your comfort zone

Working with high profile players, within pressure situations will take you out from your comfort zone. Make sure you embrace this opportunity to develop and improve yourself. You will make mistakes, you will get things wrong, you will be challenged and you will encounter disagreements. This is part of the course, this is good stuff that will help you learn and take you further.

5.Don’t take it personally

In front of you lies an exciting new challenge. One with new obstacles, pressures, excitements, which will put you in situations that will sometimes encourage you to doubt yourself and question yourself. Learn from them but refrain from taking them personally. Avoid dwelling on it or beating yourself up. After all people often says things and think things based on emotion before reason. It is important that you use your skill of reflection, at the appropriate time and with reason. This will help you to keep it all in perspective, learn from it and move forward.

6.Think outside the box

One of your strengths is your creativity, your ability to bring about new ideas and ways of thinking. Continue this within your new role, really focus on the specific demands of not just the individual fitness needs but their positional needs. Look at their movements, the decisions they make, the way they play the game, what is expected of them, the needs of the manager and develop your sessions based on that. Coach them back to fitness, don’t just get them back fit.

Self Awareness pt. 2: The Academy Coach

the advice I would give to ‘Me’ – the academy coach

I feel it is now time to chat with ‘Me’ the Academy Coach. He has been working within the academy program for 4 years at the South East London Club. After a fantastic experience with a great education it is time to start a new Chapter on the other side of town with a South West London Club. Here are six pieces of advice I would give him:

1.Embrace the education you have had

I recall when you had your 1st academy coaching session. You were organizing and setting up the session before the players arrived when you were approached by one of the Senior Academy Managers. He came up and something to you that will never forget ‘If the Academy Director sees you do a drill, he will sack you’. That shaped you into the coach you are at this moment in time. It gave you a direction, a belief and a way to work. The experience you have received within this particular environment has been invaluable because it has challenged you, taken you out of your comfort zone and helped developed your ability to adapt. Never forget this and use this to your advantage within your next opportunity.

2.Understand the brain

My advice is if you are going to study and learn anything, make sure it is on the brain. Have an understanding of how it works, develops, grows, reacts and is influenced by what you as a coach do. This will provide you with a good foundation, reasoning and will support to the type of sessions you design, and how you deliver them.

3.Be patient

Don’t worry if you don’t see immediate success. It will take time; players will develop and learn at different rates. Continue to engage and challenge the players you work with. It is a long journey for them with many up’s and downs which will impact their development. But if the players believe in what you believe, then they will have success in time.

Creativity is intelligence having fun

4.Continue to be Creative and Don’t Stand Still

Since you started coaching you have always you been observant and curious, asking why, how and what? Looking at how to develop sessions and ideas you have seen. You have also looked at other environments to engage your learning and development. Transferred across new ideas into football, which at times have been questioned, but have eventually been embraced. This kind of approach and thinking has developed your creative side and this is reflected in how you coach, challenging the players you work with. Take this further; keep moving forward as there is a whole world out there to inspire you and learn from. The only thing that is constant is ‘Change’, keeping developing and being creative.

5.Become an expert in your field

Everyone wants to reach the top but where is the top? Is it at the 1st team level or is it at the top of your specialised field? My advice is to learn, research and really understand about the specific age group you work with and become an expert in that field. Many coaches will look up, as there is more to be gained financially as they move up the ladder, but the game is crying out for coaches to become specialists/experts in these particular areas.

6.Educate the parents

Take the time to educate the parents and help them understand what they are seeing. Often with observation people will make assumptions, which will then create their opinions without actually understanding what they are seeing and why the coach is working the way they do. Invite the parents to be a part of their child’s development by allowing them to understand. After all, the player might only be working with you 7-10 hrs per week. Therefore, it is important they are encouraged to practice in the right way when away from you and also the right messages are being reinforced by the people that support them.